1921 Gold Double Eagle $20. 

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The 1921 Saint-Gaudens double eagle is a highly rare coin, especially in Mint State grades of MS-63 or higher. It is considered the premier condition rarity of the series, with the majority of specimens in circulated condition. Only a small number, estimated at eight to 10, exist in MS-63, and even fewer could reasonably be graded MS-64 or better. The rarity is attributed to the challenging conditions during its production in 1921 and subsequent melting of most coins in the 1930s.

Despite being minted in relatively high numbers (528,500), economic challenges post-World War I led to limited production of denominations. The export trade mostly involved coins from 1920, 1922, 1922-S, 1923, 1923-D, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, and 1928. The 1921, along with other mintmarked issues from 1924 to 1931 and Philadelphia Mint issues from 1929 to 1932, were retained in federal vaults as backing for Gold Certificates.

In 1934, the government initiated the recall of gold coins, including the 1921 double eagle, leading to their destruction by melting in 1937. Only around 150 coins are known to exist in all grades. The remaining specimens, especially those in middle circulated grades, now command a value exceeding $40,000, making the 1921 Saint-Gaudens double eagle a sought-after numismatic collector coin rather than a bullion investment.

The coin is generally sharply struck with frosty surfaces and average lustre, though exceptional lustre is found in top-quality examples. Color ranges from light to medium, sometimes rich orange and greenish gold. Some specimens exhibit tiny hairline die breaks in the letters of LIBERTY. Notably, three outstanding examples from the George Goddard Collection and the Eliasberg example, acquired directly from the Mint in the year of issue, stand out with their exceptional quality.

The 1921 Saint-Gaudens double eagle is a highly rare coin, especially in Mint State grades of MS-63 or higher. It is considered the premier condition rarity of the series, with the majority of specimens in circulated condition. Only a small number, estimated at eight to 10, exist in MS-63, and even fewer could reasonably be graded MS-64 or better. The rarity is attributed to the challenging conditions during its production in 1921 and subsequent melting of most coins in the 1930s.

Despite being minted in relatively high numbers (528,500), economic challenges post-World War I led to limited production of denominations. The export trade mostly involved coins from 1920, 1922, 1922-S, 1923, 1923-D, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, and 1928. The 1921, along with other mintmarked issues from 1924 to 1931 and Philadelphia Mint issues from 1929 to 1932, were retained in federal vaults as backing for Gold Certificates.

In 1934, the government initiated the recall of gold coins, including the 1921 double eagle, leading to their destruction by melting in 1937. Only around 150 coins are known to exist in all grades. The remaining specimens, especially those in middle circulated grades, now command a value exceeding $40,000, making the 1921 Saint-Gaudens double eagle a sought-after numismatic collector coin rather than a bullion investment.

The coin is generally sharply struck with frosty surfaces and average lustre, though exceptional lustre is found in top-quality examples. Color ranges from light to medium, sometimes rich orange and greenish gold. Some specimens exhibit tiny hairline die breaks in the letters of LIBERTY. Notably, three outstanding examples from the George Goddard Collection and the Eliasberg example, acquired directly from the Mint in the year of issue, stand out with their exceptional quality.

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